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Licorice Root Tea

Love Licorice?

If you love the taste of licorice, this tea is for you. It has a milder taste than licorice candy and is perfect with a little cream or as a blend with other botanical and black-based teas. It’s 50-times sweeter than sugar, but not with the subtle, overly sweet taste of many sweeteners today.

Not a big licorice fan?

Don’t give up! Licorice root is an excellent background flavor, not only in teas, but other recipes such as stews, compotes and so much more!  You may be eating licorice and not even know it was there. In fact, licorice root was long used as to enhance other flavors in foods. Not now though. It’s time we got back!!

 

Licorice Root

Pure licorice root: chew to enjoy the sweet licorice flavor. Sold as a treat in 19th and 20th century candy stores. Originally brought to North America in the 1600s, the root can also be used as a spice and tea. Includes 10 roots in a heat-sealed bag with the history on the label: easy to store, easy to carry, easy to give as a gift.

 

Dutch Chalk Licorice

Licorice… as a Toothbrush!?

Licorice root first arrived in North America in the 1600s. It was enjoyed as a spice, tea, used medicinally… and even used for dental hygiene as an early toothbrush! Enter the 1800s and up and a fascinating line of licorice sweets emerged. Licorice flavors took off in the late 1800s and early 1900s – Black Jack gumbridge mix, and the first American candy brand, Good N’ Plenty!

Dutch Chalk Licorice

Believe it or not, licorice root extract is 50x sweeter than cane sugar! Starting in the mid-1800s, licorice was enjoyed as a candy. Dutch chalk licorice is delicious black licorice candy covered in a hard candy coating. 4 oz in a heat-sealed bag with the history on the label: perfect to carry, perfect to store, perfect to give as a gift.

Marshmallow Root: The Ultimate Tea

What does marshmallow root tea taste like?   A sweet, woody flavor, the marshmallow root tea makes an interesting blend…

Black Licorice Wheels

Licorice… as a Toothbrush!?

Licorice root first arrived in North America in the 1600s. It was enjoyed as a spice, tea, used medicinally… and even used for dental hygiene as an early toothbrush! Enter the 1800s and up and a fascinating line of licorice sweets emerged.

Licorice Wheels – A Retro American Classic!

Licorice flavors in candy really took off in the late 1800s and early 1900s – Black Jack gumbridge mix, and the first American candy brand, Good N’ Plenty! The 1900s brought more fun varieties of black licorice – like Charlie Chaplin’s black laces and of course the black licorice wheel! Still delicious. Comes in a 4 oz. bag with the history on the label.

Watch Susan Benjamin talk about the History of Licorice Root

Black Licorice Laces

Licorice… as a Toothbrush!?

Licorice root first arrived in North America in the 1600s. It was enjoyed as a spice, tea, used medicinally… and even used for dental hygiene as an early toothbrush! Licorice flavors took off in the late 1800s and early 1900s – allsorts, Black Jack gumbridge mix, and the first American candy brand, Good N’ Plenty!

Charlie Chaplin’s Licorice Boot

Around 1925, Charlie Chaplin called the American Licorice Company and said he needed an edible boot for his movie “The Gold Rush.” The company complied and made him a licorice boot with string licorice laces which he ate like spaghetti. Sweet, silly, and fun! 6 oz heat-sealed bag with the history on the label.

Watch Susan Benjamin talk about the History of Licorice Root

Licorice Lovers Box

Perfect for licorice lovers!

12 samples, 50-plus pieces!

Early licorice root, 1800s Allsorts, 1900s laces, drops, & more. Historic image and story on a card.

Licorice… as a Toothbrush!?

Licorice root first arrived in North America in the 1600s. It was enjoyed as a spice, tea, used medicinally… and even used for dental hygiene as an early toothbrush! Enter the 1800s and up and a fascinating line of licorice sweets emerged. Licorice flavors took off in the late 1800s and early 1900s – Black Jack gumbridge mix, and the first American candy brand, Good N’ Plenty!

What’s In Our Licorice Lover’s Box…

This box contains a variety of licorice to sample and enjoy such as licorice Allsorts (1880s), Good n’ Plenty (1893), Licorice Laces (1920s), and chalk licorice, licorice wheels, licorice pastels and pipes from the 1940s up. Also contains a licorice root and a two-sided tag that tells the story of each. Selection may vary depending on availability.

Watch Susan Benjamin talk about the History of Licorice Root

Licorice Lovers Box… brought to you by the nation’s ONLY researched-based historic candy company. Our founder, Susan Benjamin, is author of numerous articles, even a book on the subject (her tenth) on Smithsonian’s Best Books About Food. Everything you get from True Treats is the best possible, most delicious version of her scholarly research – and Licorice Lovers Box is no exception. True Treats products are sold in museum gift stores across the county. Enjoyed in homes everywhere!

Marshmallow Root Tea

What does marshmallow root tea taste like?  

A sweet, woody flavor, the marshmallow root tea makes an interesting blend and is great on its own. I like to add a little sweetener, but that’s personal choice. The texture is smooth, as marshmallow has a high mucilage content, and thickens when cool.

 

Dutch Salt Licorice

Made of extract from the licorice root, salty licorice became popular in the1930s in Ireland, Scandinavia, and other parts of Northern Europe. The licorice plant originated in Southern Europe and grows throughout the world today. 4 oz in a heat-sealed bag with the history on the label: perfect to carry, perfect to store, perfect to give as a gift.

 

Licorice Bridge Mix with Pastels

LICORICE LOVERS! A fabulous blend of black licorice favorites,  perfect finger food and a satisfying treat. As for the story: For thousands of years, people covered fruit, nuts and seeds with sugary coatings, dating back to the ancient Romans. In the late 1800s, when machinery enabled candy-makers to quickly and inexpensively coat just about anything with sugar and chocolate,  coated nuts, caramels, marshmallows, licorice and other tasty treats came along.  Starting in the 1920s, bridge became the game to play, where players sat around tables for entire evenings. Snacks needed to be small enough to eat with their fingers without putting down their cards. From this tradition, bridge mix emerged as a favorite. As for licorice -the licorice plant came to the U.S. in the 1600s with the British. Its root was perfect as a tooth brush, spice, and, in the 1800s, a candy.  Comes in a 6-ounce recyclable bag with a twist tie and the story on the label.