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Orange Stain Glass Candy – Appalachian favorite, Handmade, with vibrant flavor

From Medicines to Treats

Hard candies such as stain glass originated as throat lozenges and treats. The boiled sugars of the 1600s evolved into drops in the 1700s – and of course stain glass. By the mid to late 1800s, familiar hard candies like butterscotch disks, clove balls, sour balls, and others were all the rage.

Stain Glass… Candy?

Colorful stained glass spans these time periods and was often made at home. It’s even featured in Martha Washington’s cookbook! As for oranges, not just the flesh and the juice were used to create treats at home. Candied orange peels were used in cakes and enjoyed as a tart and sweet snack in the 1700s.

Lemon Stain Glass Candy with Peels – Handmade, Sour & Sweet! A colonial era medicine and treat

From Medicines to Treats

Hard candies such as stain glass originated as throat lozenges and treats. The boiled sugars of the 1600s evolved into drops in the 1700s – and of course stain glass. By the mid to late 1800s, familiar hard candies like butterscotch disks, clove balls, sour balls, and others were all the rage.

Stain Glass… Candy?

Colorful stained glass spans these time periods and was often made at home. It’s even featured in Martha Washington’s cookbook! As for lemons, not just the flesh and the juice were used to create treats at home. Candied lemon peels were used in cakes and enjoyed as a sour and sweet snack in the 1700s.

 

4 oz – Comes with a label with an historic image on the front and the story on the back!

Spearmint Stain Glass Candy with Leaves – Handmade, Colonial Era, Perfect for the Mint Lover

From Medicines to Treats

Hard candies such as stain glass originated as throat lozenges and treats. The boiled sugars of the 1600s evolved into drops in the 1700s – and of course stain glass. By the mid to late 1800s, familiar hard candies like butterscotch disks, clove balls, sour balls, and others were all the rage.

Stain Glass… Candy?

Colorful stained glass spans these time periods and was often made at home. It’s even featured in Martha Washington’s cookbook! As for mint, spearmint is thought to be the “mint” of the Bible. It has been valued for centuries as a curative, as a tea, for its aroma, and for flavor. Comes in a 4 oz. bag with the history on the label.

Lavender Stain Glass Candy with Flowers – Featured in Martha Washington’s cookbook, relaxing scent

From Medicines to Treats

Hard candies such as stain glass originated as throat lozenges and treats. The boiled sugars of the 1600s evolved into drops in the 1700s – and of course stain glass. By the mid to late 1800s, familiar hard candies like butterscotch disksclove ballssour balls, and others were all the rage.

Stain Glass… Candy?

Colorful stained glass spans these time periods and was often made at home. It’s even featured in Martha Washington’s cookbook! As for Lavender, its long been used as a remedy, for relaxation, as a pleasant and powerful scent. It’s a flower long in symbolism – the Biblical “nard.”  These stain glass candies (circa 1700s) contain actual lavender flowers, reminiscent of the ancient method of suspending petals, nuts and seeds in sugar. Comes in a 4 oz bag with the history on the label.

Handmade Rose Stain Glass Candy with Petals – A beloved 1700s choice of Martha Washington. Aromatic!

From Medicines to Treats

Hard candies such as stain glass originated as throat lozenges and treats. The boiled sugars of the 1600s evolved into drops in the 1700s – and of course stain glass. By the mid to late 1800s, familiar hard candies like butterscotch disksclove ballssour balls, and others were all the rage.

Stain Glass… Candy?

Colorful stained glass spans these time periods and was often made at home. It’s even featured in Martha Washington’s cookbook! And rose flower? Roses have long been a symbol of love, used in syrups, and a variety of confections. These stain glass candies (circa 1700s) contain actual rose petals, reminiscent of the ancient method of suspending petals, nuts and seeds in sugar. Comes in a 4 oz bag with the history on the label.

Handmade Cherry Stain Glass Candy – Originated as throat lozenges, classic cherry flavor – an iconic treat

From Medicines to Treats

Hard candies such as stain glass originated as throat lozenges and treats. The boiled sugars of the 1600s evolved into drops in the 1700s – and of course stain glass. By the mid to late 1800s, familiar hard candies like butterscotch disksclove ballssour balls, and others were all the rage.

Stain Glass… Candy?

Colorful stained glass spans these time periods and was often made at home. It’s even featured in Martha Washington’s cookbook! And the cherries? Cherries were of course enjoyed for their fruit, but the bark was also used as a sore throat remedy among Native Americans and colonists. Comes in a 4 oz bag with the history on the label.

1700s Time Capsule with a Letter from the Time Traveler, in a stylish capsule

The perfect chance for kids to experience history in an entirely new way – a visceral experience where they taste the flavors of the past, with samples from the Colonists, Native Americans, and others of the time.  The time capsule is filled with ten items in all – such as candied peels, Turkish delight, sugar plums, licorice root, rock candy and stain glass.  Most important, they’ll find a letter from the Time Traveler written just for them, telling them about each selection. They’ll also find a sampling of modern  candies as a point of fun and comparison.

Selection may vary slightly depending on availability.

Historic Hard Candy Sampler – Thank You

50+pieces, 12 candy types, found in apothecaries, saloons, grandmothers’ purses, & card w/ historic illustration and story of each selection.

 

An assortment of hard candies through time, from stain glass (1600s) to sour balls (a favorite of troops in WWII) to butterscotch enjoyed by grandparents everywhere. And don’t forget Cold War-era cinnamon candies, peppermint swirls, and a variety of others used to relieve sore throats, cover the smell of booze on the breath, and give as a gift of love.

Historical Hard Candy Sampler. 12 kinds, 50-plus pieces. Grandma’s favorites to unexpected.

50+pieces, 12 candy types, found in apothecaries, saloons, grandmothers’ purses, & card w/ historic illustration and story of each selection.

 

An assortment of hard candies through time, from stain glass (1600s) to sour balls (a favorite of troops in WWII) to butterscotch enjoyed by grandparents everywhere. And don’t forget Cold War-era cinnamon candies, peppermint swirls, and a variety of others used to relieve sore throats, cover the smell of booze on the breath, and give as a gift of love.

Ice Blue Mints

Retro Hard Candy Started As Medicine?!

Who knew? Hard candies originated as throat lozenges and treats. The boiled sugars of the 1600s evolved into drops in the 1700s – and course stain glass. By the mid to late 1800s, familiar hard candies were all the rage. By the turn of the century and beyond, these beloved candies found their way into your grandmother’s purse or prominently featured in her candy dish alongside anise squares, butterscotch disks, starlight mints, clove balls, and others.

Remember Ice Blue Mints? You Asked, We Found Them!

Not too much information is known about this vibrant blue peppermint candy, but we believe they were first made by Brachs, in a more defined shape. They no longer make them in their original packing & form, but you can still enjoy them in a perfectly sphere ball. It’s the perfect combination of peppermint and nostalgia. Our Facebook friends asked and we found them!

Watch this Video from Candy Historian Susan Benjamin on Ice Blue Mints!

Sour Tangerine Drops – The first tangerine tree in America was planted in New Orleans. Tart & tangy!

From Medicines to Treats

Hard candies such as stain glass originated as throat lozenges and treats. The boiled sugars of the 1600s evolved into drops in the 1700s – and of course stain glass. By the mid to late 1800s, familiar hard candies like butterscotch disksclove ballssour balls, and others were all the rage.

What About the Tangerine?

Hard candies became popular around the time the tangerine arrived in America – the mid-1800s. The first tangerine tree in America was planted by an Italian diplomat in a consulate garden in New Orleans. Tart, tangy, and delicious! 4 oz. bag with the history on the label.

Elder Flower Vinegar – Exclusive to True Treats. Use on salads, sandwiches, ice cream & more.

Botanical Infused Vinegars – A 1700s favorite!

“Vinaigriers”, primarily enslaved or free black people, fermented vinegar from sugar cane juice and sold their vinegars in market stalls in New Orleans or door-to-door. Vinegars infused with elder flower and rose flower are mentioned in Martha Washington’s cookbook along with stain glass candy, another favorite treat of the era.

Vinegar… On Ice Cream?

Our authentic botanical vinegars taste great on salads, French fries, or sandwiches. But a True Treats staff favorite is adding a few dashes of the elder flower or rose flower vinegar to vanilla ice cream. Try it! You’ll love it.